Shop By Category

6 Tips To Keep Your House Plants Alive During Summer

Summertime is a great season for houseplants and people. Both can enjoy warmer days and more hours of sunlight. Just as you do things to protect yourself from the heat and sun, your plants need that type of care too. Here are six summer plant care tips to keep your house plants alive during summer.

1. Make Watering Adjustments

Water is important for the survival of your plants. Like you, they also need more of it during the summer months. So, water your plants weekly and try to do it early in the morning or in the evening when it’s cooler. And if you know that a heat wave is coming, water them well so they won’t dry out. Also, don’t water too fast and make sure they absorb it all. Since water evaporates faster in hot weather, check your soil often. If it feels dry an inch or two down into the dirt, your plant needs water. If you notice dirt pulling away from the sides of the pot, that's a sign too. You can place rocks or mulch on top of the soil to help keep the moisture in.

2. Prevent Exposure To Direct Sunlight

Although bright sunny days are beautiful, too much sun can be harmful to your plants. Direct sunlight, especially midday, can burn their leaves and dry them out. To avoid this, angle window blinds away from your plants. You can use a sheer curtain to cover windows and provide some shade for them. Moving plants away from windowsills and more towards the inner part of the room also helps.

3. Maintain a Stable Environment

For indoor plants to survive, they need a stable environment. Extreme temperature changes are never good for them. Most houseplants originate from tropical areas and thrive in humidity. Be mindful of this while running your air conditioner, especially since they tend to dry the air out. You can combat this and provide the humidity your plants need by placing them near each other, misting them, turning on a humidifier, or placing pebble trays under their pots.

4. Look for Signs of Stress

It’s important to check your houseplants often for early signs of stress. This can show up when leaves wilt or fall off. They may also turn pale, and sunburned leaves will start turning yellow or brown. All these issues could be the result of too much heat, not enough water, or a bug infestation. By noticing these things early, you can correct the problem and protect your plants.

5. Fertilize, Prune, and Repot Carefully

Part of caring for your plants includes fertilizing, pruning, and repotting. But another one of the summer plant care tips is knowing when to do this. You should never fertilize, prune or repot a plant during extreme temperatures since your plant may be experiencing stress from the heat. All these activities can add to that stress, so it’s better to wait until it's cooler and your plant has recovered.  

6. Dust Your Leaves Often

As air pollutants increase in the summertime, so does the dust on your leaves. This can decrease the amount of light your plants can absorb and convert to food. Be sure to wipe your plants off every few weeks with a damp rag or wet paper towel.

Take Care of Your Plants

Your houseplants are living things and depend on you. Use these summer plant care tips to give them the care and protection they need. Are you looking for plant supplies or new plants to add to your home? At Red's Home & Garden we can help you find what you need. Come by and visit or call us at (336) 973-5521 and we will help you.

6 Tips To Keep Your Indoor Plants Happy All Winter Long

During the cold, dry months of winter, you've probably noticed that your houseplants struggle. Thanks to low-light conditions and a lack of humidity, it can be a challenge to keep your leafy friends looking their best. However, the following indoor plant tips can ensure that your plants look green and healthy throughout the winter season.

Increase Humidity

When the temperatures drop, you turn your home's heater on, which is good for keeping you warm and toasty but bad for the health of your plants. Your heating system dries out the air in your home, and most houseplants are tropical and prefer humidity. If you notice droopy or limp leaves, you need to find a way to increase the humidity in your home or at least in the vicinity of your plants.   There are a couple of ways you can do this. You can run the heat less often and utilize a humidifier, or you can place your plants' pots on a tray of pebbles covered in a shallow layer of water. As the water evaporates, it creates humidity that your plants will love.

Avoid Repotting

During the winter, your plants are working hard just to survive, so they become stressed and stop growing. This is normal and not a cause for concern, but you should avoid repotting your plants until the spring. Repotting in the winter adds even more stress and can be too much for even the hardiest of houseplants to handle. If you find a new pot at the store that you just have to have, either slide the plant, existing pot and all, into the new one or simply wait until conditions are better to repot.

Wait To Fertilize

In a similar vein, houseplants do not need fertilizer during the winter, since they are not pushing any new growth. Most plants that are kept in homes are native to other parts of the world and have adapted to conditions in which they do not have access to nutrients during a portion of the year. It can be tempting to want to feed your plants in the winter, especially if they start looking a little sad. However, be sure to hold off until spring when they're ready to take off again.

Check for Drafts

If you have plants on a windowsill or shelves near a window or door, be sure to check for drafts. The cold air can damage the plants and cause them to lose leaves or even die altogether. Remember that glass gets very cold in the winter as well, so make sure that no leaves are touching a window.

Cut Back on Watering

Overwatering your plants is just as bad, if not worse, than not watering enough. Excess water can lead to root rot and a mushy, dead houseplant. During the winter, your plants do not need nearly as much water as they did during the rest of the year. A good rule of thumb is to water your plant thoroughly and then wait until the top inch or so of soil is completely dry.

Find the Light

Because the days are shorter and your plants will have less light during the winter, you may need to move things around to give them as much light as possible. If you normally have them near a north-facing window, move them to a south or west-facing window so that they can soak up the sunlight and stay happy. These indoor plant tips should be enough to keep your collection of houseplants happy all winter long, whether you have one plant or 50. You'll be glad that you have something green to look at when it's cold and gray outside, so take good care of them! If you need a new plant, check out the selection at Red's Home & Garden.
Subscribe To Our Newsletter